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How to Handwrite Chinese Characters with Finesse: Part 2

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If you don’t have time to learn the strokes now, you can get your How to Handwrite Chinese Characters with Finesse: Part 2 PDF and study them later.

This is the second half of our article on how to handwrite Chinese characters addressing some more complex strokes. If you haven’t already, don’t forget to take a look at the first part of our post: How to Handwrite Chinese Characters with Finesse.

钩画的写法 (gōu huà de xiě fǎ) How to write the ‘Gou’ Stroke

横钩 (héng gōu) ‘Heng Gou’ Horizontal Line with a Tick

First, write the 一 ‘heng’ stroke, then wield the pen down to the left to write the hook. End with a light sharp point. Note that the hook should be small and short.

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Example Character:  (mǎi)

The ‘heng gou’ stroke is the first stroke found on the top of the character.

竖钩 (shù gōu) ‘Shu Gou’ Vertical Line with a Tick

Write the丨’shu’ stroke, wielding the pen up to the left to write a hook. End with a sharp point. The hook should be at a 45-degree angle and short.

Note: Take a look at the difference between this stroke and the 弯钩 stroke which is slightly more curved.

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Example Character: (xiǎo)

The ‘shu gou’ stroke is the second stroke found in the center of the character.

竖提 (shù tí) ‘Shu Ti’ Vertical Line with an Upward Tick

Write the丨’shu’ stroke, wielding the pen up to the right to write a ㇀’ti’. Finally ending with sharp point.

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Example Character: (cháng)

The ‘shu ti’ stroke is found in the second stroke on the left-hand side.

 

横折钩 (héng zhé gōu) ‘Heng Zhe Gou’ Horizontal Line Followed by a Right Angle and Tick

Start with a short 一 ‘heng’, wielding the pen down and slightly to the left to write a丨 ‘shu’ stroke. Follow this with a hook, and end with a sharp point. It should be written in one stroke, meaning the pen should not come off the paper.

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Example Character (sháo)

The ‘heng zhe gou’ stroke is the second stroke in the character.

竖折折钩 (shù zhé zhé gōu) ‘Shu Zhe Zhe Gou’ Vertical Folding Hook

Start with short a丨’shu’ stroke, wielding the pen right to write 一 ‘heng’. Then wield the pen down to the left to write亅’shu gou’, and end with sharp point. Note that the 亅should not be too vertical and the hook should be small.

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Example Character: (niǎo)

The ‘shu zhe zhe gou’ stroke is the fourth in the character.

横撇弯钩 (héng piě wān gōu) ‘Heng Pie Wan Gou’ Horizontal Bending Hook

Start with short a 一 ‘heng’ stroke, then turn to write a short 丿’pie’. Finally, add a small hook to top left.

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Example Character: (zǐ)

The ‘heng pie wan gou’ is the second stroke.

横折折折钩 (héng zhé zhé zhé gōu) ‘Heng zhe zhe zhe gou’ Folding Hook Cross Fold

Start with a short 一 ‘heng’ (the right side should be a little bit higher) and turn to write a short 丿, then turn again to write a short 一 ‘heng’. Finally, turn down to the left to write a hook. Note that the last part should be an acute angle.

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Example Character: (nǎi)

The ‘heng zhe zhe zhe gou’ stroke is found in the second half of the character on the right-hand side.

横折提 (héng zhé tí) ‘Heng Zhi Ti’ Horizontal-Starting Right Angle With an Upward Tick

Start with short a 一 ‘heng’ stroke, then turn to write 丨’shu’.  Turn right to write ㇀’ti’, and end with a sharp point. The ㇀’ti’ should be short and inclined.

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Example Character: (huà)

The ‘heng zhi ti’ stroke is the second stroke in the ‘speech’ radical on the left-hand side.

折画的写法 (zhé huà de xiě fǎ) How to write the ‘Zhe’ Stroke

横折 (héng zhé) ‘Heng Zhe’ Horizontal-Starting Right Angle

Start with the 一 ‘heng’ stroke, then turn to write the 丨’shu’ stroke. It should be finished in one stroke, and the end cannot be a sharp point.

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Example Character: (zhōng)

The ‘heng zhe’ stroke is the second stroke.

竖折 (shù zhé) ‘Shu Zhe’ Vertical Fold

Start with the 丨 ‘shu’ stroke. This is sometimes short and sometimes a long stroke. Turn right to write a 一 ‘heng’ stoke and end heavily. It should be finished in one stroke.

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Example Character: (qū)

The ‘shu zhe’ stroke is the fourth stroke in the character.

横撇 (héng piě) ‘Heng Pie’ Horizontal Downward Stroke

Start with a short 一 ‘heng’ and then turn left to write 丿 ‘pie’. It should be finished in one stroke, and the right side of 一 ‘heng’ should be a little higher.

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Example Character: (yòu)

The ‘heng pie’ stroke is the first in this character.

撇折 (piě zhé) ‘Pie Zhe’ Left-Slanting Downward Stroke

Start with a short 丿 ‘pie’ then turn at the top right to write ㇀’ti’ and then end with a sharp point.

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Example Character: (dōng)

‘Pie zhe’ is the second stroke in the top half of the character.

撇点 (piě diǎn) ‘Pie Dian’ Left-Slanting Downward Dot

Start with  丿 ’pie’, then turn down to the right to write a long 丶’dian’ ending the stroke heavily. Note the angles of 丿 and 丶.

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Example Character: (nǚ)

‘Pie dian’ is the first stroke in the (nǚ) character.

竖折撇 (shù zhé piě) ‘Shu Zhe Pie’ Vertical Fold

Start with an inclined 丨 ‘shu’ then turn to write a short 一 ‘heng’. Finally, turn down to the left to write a short 丿’pie’.

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Example Character: (zhuān)

‘Shu zhe pie’ is the third stroke in the character.

横折折撇 (héng zhé zhé piě) ‘Heng Zhe Zhe Pie’ Horizontal-Starting Right Angle With Left-Slanting Downward Stroke

Start with a short 一 ‘heng’ stroke then turn down to the left to write a short 丿 ‘pie’ without a sharp point. Write a short 一 ‘heng’, and finally turn down to write 丿 ‘pie’.

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Example Characters: (jí) and (jiàn)

含有“弯”的笔画的写法 (hán yǒu ‘wān’ de bǐ huà de xiě fǎ) How to write Strokes containing ‘wan’

弯钩 (wān gōu) ‘Wan Gou’ Hook

Start from light to heavy to write bend and hook. The start and end should be on the same vertical line.

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Example Character: (gǒu)

‘Wan gou’ is the second stroke of the (gǒu) character.

斜钩 (xié gōu) ‘Xie Gou’ Concave Hook

Start heavily, wielding the pen down to the right to write the bend and hook.

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Example Character: (wǒ)

‘Xie gou’ is the fifth stroke in the (wǒ) character.

卧钩 (wò gōu) ‘Wo Gou’ Lying Hook

Start light, wielding the pen down to the right first, then turn right to write the bend and hook.

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Example Character: (bì)

The ‘wo gou’ stroke is the second one.

竖弯钩 (shù wān gōu) ‘Shu Wan Gou’ Vertical Hook

Start with a 丨’shu’ stroke a bit heavily, turn right bend to write the 一 ‘heng’ stroke and hook.

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Example Character: (luàn)

‘Shu wan gou’ is the right-hand side of the (luàn) character.

横折弯钩 (héng zhé wān gōu) ‘Heng Zhe Wan Gou’ Bending Hook

Start with the 一 ‘heng’ stroke, then turn to write 丨 ‘shu’. Finally, make a right bend to write 一 ‘heng’ and a hook.

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Example Character: (jiǔ)

‘heng zhe wan gou’ is the second stroke in the (jiǔ) character.

横折弯 (héng zhé wān) ‘Heng Zhe Wan’ Horizontal Bend

Start with a short 一 ’heng’ stroke, then turn to write a short丨’shu’ stroke. Finally, take a right bend to write a short 一 ‘heng’, and end heavily.

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Example Character (méi)

The ‘heng zhe wan’ stroke is the fifth stroke on the top of the character.

If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below!

               

Facebook Comments

  • Darek Malinowski

    Great article, thanks for that!

    • Hollie Sowden

      Thanks, Darek. Glad you found it useful!

  • Nora Joy Wilson

    So great! Helps me fix my odd-looking handwriting 😛 Now if I can only figure out how to do the stroke that goes along the bottom in words like 近, 进, 还,etc. Some of my teachers have told me to write it in 2 pieces and some say it’s one stroke. Some of them have told me to write it first before the rest of the character and others have told me to write it last to finish it up. Some say to put a loop in the corner, others not. I still don’t know what the proper way is! 55555!

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